Tag Archives: reuse slides

Help! My PowerPoint file is too large for email!

Have you ever found yourself with a PowerPoint that turned into a 12 megabyte file that was not conducive to emailing? Most of us have been there. Here I’ll explain a few tricks that can help you keep the size of your PowerPoint files reasonable.

Use the “Reuse Slides” function when you reuse materials from previous presentations to cut down on the overall file size of your PowerPoint.

 

 

Don’t copy/paste slides from old presentations. I think most of us have copy/pasted slides from old presentations into new presentations. Unfortunately, copy/pasting can contribute to larger file sizes. It’s okay to reuse your content, but try the “Reuse Slides” feature to save some space. You can find this function in the Home tab. Choose new slide, reuse slides.

Resize your photos. Often times large file sizes are a result of using photos that are too large. Today’s high megapixel cameras take photos that are much higher quality than is necessary in PowerPoint. Photos should be resized before inserting them in a presentation. Shoot for matching your photo resolution to the screen resolution of the computer or projector it will be presented with. If you’re not sure, 1024 pixels x 768 pixels is a good place to start. There are several ways to resize photos. Choose one that works best for you.

Don’t copy/paste or click and drag.  When photos and images are copied and pasted or clicked and dragged into a presentation, PowerPoint doesn’t effectively compress the data which can cause an increase in overall file size. To avoid this, use the insert picture function found in the Insert tab. When images are added to PowerPoint using this function, the program does a better job of compressing them. On top of that, you can manually compress them further.

Compress your photos from within PowerPoint. This is a great feature of PowerPoint. To compress your images, click on a photo from within the presentation, open Picture Tools and click Compress Pictures. Within the compression options, you can choose an appropriate output size for your purposes.

 

Save in the latest version of PowerPoint available

A presentation saved as a “97-2003 presentation” file type will be larger in size than one saved as a standard PowerPoint presentation. It’s not always a big difference in size between the two, but every bit helps.

 

In my research for this post, I used Microsoft PowerPoint 2007 to compare a presentation using three 4320×3240 photos clicked and dragged into the slides with the same presentation following the tips above. The click/drag version was nearly five megabytes. The version following the tips above resulted in a much more manageable 523 kilobyte file.

What PowerPoint tricks have you learned? Share them in our comments section.

 

Joe Ferlito is an account manager at Franco Public Relations Group. You can reach him at (313) 567-5031 or ferlito@franco.com.